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NORML Responds: White House Threatens To Crack Down On Legal Marijuana

Thursday, 23 February 2017

Trump and Sessions seek to undermine the will of the American People in regards to marijuana policy

Washington, DC: White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer suggested that the Trump administration will step up enforcement of federal laws against recreational marijuana. “I do believe that you’ll see greater enforcement,” Spicer said, and added that the exact policy is “a question for the Department of Justice.”

The Department of Justice is lead by Jeff Sessions, a renowned ardent marijuana prohibitionist.

“If the Trump administration goes through with a crackdown on states that have legalized marijuana they will be taking billions of dollars away from state sanctioned businesses and putting that money back into the hands of drug cartels. This action will lead to swift backlash from the 71% of Americans that think marijuana policy should be dictated by the states and is a foolish and reckless direction to take our country. Sad.” said Erik Altieri, Executive Director of NORML.

The Press Secretary’s comments are similar to those made by Sen. Sessions during his vetting process when he made clear that any use of marijuana remains against federal law and that “it is not the Attorney General’s job to decide what laws to enforce.”

“Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions both hold views that are out of step with mainstream America and they are in conflict with the laws regarding marijuana in over half of the states in this country,” said Justin Strekal, Political Director of NORML. “The fact that President Trump would allow his Attorney General to pursue a path that is so politically unpopular and contrary to will of numerous states is absurd.”

Ultimately, patients and others in legal jurisdictions will only truly be safe from federal prosecution when and if members of Congress elect to amend federal marijuana laws in a manner that comports with majority public opinion and the plant’s rapidly changing legal and cultural status. Congressional passage of HR 975, ‘The Respect State Marijuana Laws Act,’ which NORML supports and/or re-authorization of the Rohrabacher-Farr (now to be introduced as Rohrabacher-Blumenauer) amendment would be steps in the right direction to protect patients and others in legal states from undue federal interference.

If federal politicians were truly listening to the will of the electorate, they would move forward to enact these changes, which are strongly in line with voters’ sentiments. According to national polling data released today, 71 percent of voters — including majorities of Democrats, Independents, and Republicans — say that they “oppose the government enforcing federal laws against marijuana in states that have already legalized medical or recreational marijuana.”

In short, undermining voters’ wishes and state laws in this regard not only defies common sense, it is also bad politics — particularly for an administration that is defining itself as populist in nature.

For more information, please contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at justin@norml.org

Article copied and pasted from Normal.org .. great place to get information on all things Marijuana / Cannabis thank you Norml for all you do.

Article copied from Norml.org

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Damn I Want One of These!

February 27, 2017

I really want one of these. Very expensive but I do think that it would pay for it’s self over a short period of time. My hope is because it’s the first the prices will be overly priced until it becomes more common and competitors arive bringing down the house. Now I’m not suggesting this product only because it isn’t anything tangible yet. You have you deposit $300. at time of ordering to an unknown comapny then wait until September 2017 to pay balance at time of delivery. Hmm I’m hoping this becomes our latest innovation. Personal growers at attainable prices. Keep your fingers crossed fellow smokers.

LEAF on GetLeaf.co

$300 Deposit

($2690 at Shipping)

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Here’s a list of States from Norml.com working through legalization of Marijuana.

Once again thank you Norml.org for your information, hard work and all you do.

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Medical marijuana usa

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Quotes Found On: Easy Smoke.com

The prestige of government has undoubtedly been lowered considerably by the prohibition law. For nothing is more destructive of respect for the government and the law of the land than passing laws which cannot be enforced. It is an open secret that the dangerous increase of crime in this country is closely connected with this.”
Albert Einstein quote on Hemp

English: Medical marijuana neon sign at a disp...

Image via Wikipedia

16 Legal Medical Marijuana States and DC
Laws, Fees, and Possession Limits

Article found Medical Marijuana Pro Con.org

I. Summary Chart

II. Details by State

III. Sources

I. Summary Chart: 16 states and DC that have enacted laws to legalize medical marijuana
State Year Passed How Passed
(Yes Vote)
Fee Possession Limit Accepts other states’ registry ID cards?
1. Alaska
1998
Ballot Measure 8 (58%)
$25/$20
1 oz usable; 6 plants (3 mature, 3 immature)
unknown1
2010 Proposition 203 (50.13%) $150/$75 2.5 oz usable; 0-12 plants2 Yes3
3. California
1996
Proposition 215 (56%)
$66/$33
8 oz usable; 6 mature or 12 immature plants4 No
4. Colorado
2000
Ballot Amendment 20 (54%)
$90
2 oz usable; 6 plants (3 mature, 3 immature)
No
5. DC 2010 Amendment Act B18-622 (13-0 vote) * 2 oz dried; limits on other forms to be determined unknown
6. Delaware 2011 Senate Bill 17 (27-14 House, 17-4 Senate) ** 6 oz usable Yes5
7. Hawaii
2000
Senate Bill 862 (32-18 House; 13-12 Senate)
$25
3 oz usable; 7 plants (3 mature, 4 immature)
No
8. Maine
1999
Ballot Question 2 (61%) $100/$75
2.5 oz usable; 6 plants
Yes6
9. Michigan 2008 Proposal 1 (63%) $100/$25 2.5 oz usable; 12 plants Yes
10. Montana
2004
Initiative 148 (62%)
$25/$10
1 oz usable; 4 plants (mature); 12 seedlings
No
11. Nevada
2000
Ballot Question 9 (65%)
$150+
1 oz usable; 7 plants (3 mature, 4 immature)
No
12. New Jersey
2010
Senate Bill 119 (48-14 House; 25-13 Senate) $200/$20
2 oz usable
unknown
13. New Mexico 2007 Senate Bill 523 (36-31 House; 32-3 Senate) $0
6 oz usable; 16 plants (4 mature, 12 immature)
No
14. Oregon
1998
Ballot Measure 67 (55%)
$100/$20
24 oz usable; 24 plants (6 mature, 18 immature)
No
15. Rhode Island
2006
Senate Bill 0710 (52-10 House; 33-1 Senate)
$75/$10
2.5 oz usable; 12 plants
Yes
16. Vermont
2004
Senate Bill 76 (22-7) HB 645 (82-59)
$50
2 oz usable; 9 plants (2 mature, 7 immature)
No
17. Washington
1998
Initiative 692 (59%)
24 oz usable; 15 plants
No
Notes:
  1. Residency Requirement – 14 of the 16 states require proof of residency to be considered a qualifying patient for medical marijuana use. Only Oregon has announced that it will accept out-of-state applications. It is unknown if Delaware will accept applications from non-state residents once the program is established.
  2. Home Cultivation – Karen O’Keefe, JD, Director of State Policies for Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), told ProCon.org in a May 13, 2011 email that “Patients and/or their caregivers can cultivate in 14 of the 16 states. Home cultivation is not allowed in Delaware, New Jersey, or the District of Columbia and a special license is required in New Mexico. In Arizona, patients can only cultivate if they lived 25 miles or more from a dispensary when they applied for their card.”
  3. Patient Registration – Karen O’Keefe stated the following in a Sep. 9, 2011 email to ProCon.org:

    “Affirmative defenses, which protect from conviction but not arrest, are or may be available in several states even if the patient doesn’t have an ID card: Rhode Island, Michigan, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, and, in some circumstances, Delaware. Hawaii also has a separate ‘choice of evils’ defense. Patient ID cards are voluntary in Maine and California, but in California they offer the strongest legal protection. In Delaware, the defense will only be available until the state has an ID card program up and running and between when a patient submits a valid application and receives their ID card. In addition, Montana had an affirmative defense that was repealed by the legislature in 2011, but a referendum campaign has been launched to reverse the law and put it on hold.

    The states with no protection unless you’re registered are: Alaska (except for that even non-medical use is protected in one’s home due to the state constitutional right to privacy), Arizona, Montana, Vermont, New Mexico, and New Jersey. Washington, D.C. also requires registration.”

  1. Maryland – Maryland passed two laws that, although favorable to medical marijuana, do not legalize its use. Senate Bill 502  (72 KB), the “Darrell Putman Bill” (Resolution #0756-2003) was approved in the state senate by a vote of 29-17, signed into law by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr. on May 22, 2003, and took effect on Oct. 1, 2003. The law allows defendants being prosecuted for the use or possession of marijuana to introduce evidence of medical necessity and physician approval, to be considered by the court as a mitigating factor. If the court finds that the case involves medical necessity, the maximum penalty is a fine not exceeding $100. The law does not protect users of medical marijuana from arrest nor does it establish a registry program.On May 10, 2011, Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley signed SB 308  (500 KB), into law. SB 308 removed criminal penalties for medical marijuana patients who meet the specified conditions, but patients are still subject to arrest. The bill provides an affirmative defense for defendants who have been diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition that is “severe and resistant to conventional medicine.” The affirmative defense does not apply to defendants who used medical marijuana in public or who were in possession of more than one ounce of marijuana. The bill also created a Work Group to “develop a model program to facilitate patient access to marijuana for medical purposes.”

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“I think people need to be educated to the fact that marijuana is not a drug. Marijuana is an herb and a flower. God put it here. If He put it here and He wants it to grow, what gives the government the right to say that God is wrong?””
Willie Nelson quote on Marijuana


“Even if one takes every reefer madness allegation of the prohibitionists at face value, marijuana prohibition has done far more harm to far more people than marijuana ever could.”
– William F. Buckley Jr. quote on Marijuana

One’s condition on marijuana is always existential. One can feel the importance of each moment and how it is changing one. One feels one’s being, one becomes aware of the enormous apparatus of nothingness — the hum of a hi-fi set, the emptiness of a pointless interruption, one becomes aware of the war between each of us, how the nothingness in each of us seeks to attack the being of others, how our being in turn is attacked by the nothingness in others”
Norman Mailer quote on Marijuana

             

 6 States with Pending Legislation to Legalize Medical Marijuana

                                     (as of Aug. 4, 2011)

1. Illinois 2. Massachusetts 3. New Hampshire
4. New York 5. Ohio 6. Pennsylvania

Found on Medical Marijuana . Pro Con.org

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Fibromyalgia and Medical Marijuana

What the experts have to say about the use of marijuana for treating fibromyalgia. (continued)
The uses of medical marijuana

“Medical marijuana has many uses,” Abrams says. “It increases appetite while decreasing nausea and vomiting. It also works against pain and may be synergistic with pain medications, helps people sleep, and improves mood. I think it’s a shame that we don’t allow people to access that medicine.”

Medical marijuana doesn’t “cure” disease. But patients worldwide have used it to relieve a variety of symptoms, including:

increased intraocular pressure from glaucoma
nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy for cancer
pain, muscle spasticity, and insomnia from spinal cord injury
pain, stiffness, and muscle spasticity from multiple sclerosis
weight loss and loss of appetite from HIV
In 2003, Abrams published a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine on the interaction between medical marijuana and protease inhibitors in AIDS patients. “We showed that there was no real downside to smoking cannabis for these patients. It didn’t interfere with their immune system. In fact, it might have been beneficial to their immune system in the end.”

The pros and cons of medical marijuana for pain

Abrams found that medical marijuana worked for patients with HIV and peripheral neuropathy (painful, damaged nerves). That study was published in TheJournal of Neurology in 2007. “We did a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial that demonstrated that smoked cannabis was effective in this situation,” says Abrams. “The people who say there’s no evidence that smoked marijuana has any medicinal benefits really can’t say that anymore. The drug was quite comparable to the best available treatment we currently have for painful peripheral neuropathy.”

Not all doctors agree.

“I see no role for it in pain management,” says Charles Chabal, MD. Chabal is a pain management specialist at Evergreen Hospital in Kirkland, Wash. “You’ll certainly find doctors who’ll be very supportive and write prescriptions for medical marijuana. But it’s how the individual physician reads the data and the evidence. There’s no doubt it makes you feel good, but so does alcohol.”

Chabal continues, “Another problem I have with marijuana is that it’s herbal, untested, and you never know what you’re getting when you buy it.”

Chabal doesn’t bring up medical marijuana with his patients. “Some patients have asked me about it. They want me to write a prescription for medical marijuana. But that’s not something I do. I don’t want to be known as ‘the medical marijuana doctor.’ Already, doing pain management, one of the big things I need to sort out are the patients who are using pain medications appropriately versus those who are abusing them. We have a lot of social responsibility with that.

“I’m not aware of any evidence that medical marijuana is one of the tools we’d use to improve physical and social function, including interaction with loved ones and family — all key determinants of quality of life,” says Chabal.

Article found on WebMD
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Justice Department Clarifies Stance on Medical Marijuana

How Cannabis Fights Cancer
mouse tumors cured by thc Here it is, the latest in cannabisresearch, reported in a top science journal that explains in precise detail how cannabis kills tumors, cuts off their blood supply, and protects healthy cells.  Download this file and give it to your physician.

Pot Shrinks Tumors;
Government Knew in ’74

In 1974 researchers at the Medical College of Virginia, who had been funded by the National Institute of Health to find evidence that marijuana damages the immune system, found instead that THC slowed the growth of three kinds of cancer in mice – lung and breast cancer, and leukemia. A quarter century later, scientists in Spain repeated this experiment and got the same incredible results.

Medical Marijuana and Driving:
A Review of the Scientific Evidence

A 2002 review of seven separate studies involving 7,934 drivers reported, “Crash culpability studies have failed to demonstrate that drivers with cannabinoids in the blood are significantly more likely than drug-free drivers to be culpable in road crashes.” This result is likely because subject under the influence of marijuana are aware of their impairment and compensate for it accordingly, such as by slowing down and by focusing their attention when they know a response will be required. This reaction is just the opposite of that exhibited by drivers under the influence of alcohol, who tend to drive in a more risky manner proportional to their intoxication.

http://www.womensmarijuanamovement.org/

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                                                                                                                             Pros and Cons

CORE QUESTION

Should marijuana be a medical option?

Medical Value

Medical Value
American Medical Association (AMA)
Marinol v. Medical Marijuana

Diseases / Conditions

AIDS (HIV) & AIDS Wasting
Alzheimer’s Disease
Arthritis
Asthma / Breathing Disorders
Crohn’s / Gastrointestinal Disorders
Epilepsy / Seizures
Glaucoma
Hepatitis C
Migraines
Multiple Sclerosis / Muscle Spasms
Nausea / Chemotherapy
Pain / Analgesia
Psychological Conditions
Tourette’s Syndrome
Terminally Ill

Non-Smoked Marijuana

Medical Value & Risk
Public Policy

Public Policy on Medical Marijuana

Risks

Medical Risks
Teens & Adolescents
Gateway / Stepping Stone
Addictiveness
Human Reproduction

US Government and Medical Marijuana

1999 Institute of Medicine Report
Legal US Medical Marijuana Patients
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
Federal Drug Scheduling
Government Grown Marijuana

Access to Medical Marijuana

Clubs / Clinics
Dosage / Potency
Patients

Legal Issues

Legal Issues for Physicians
US Government v. Patients / Clinics
General Legal Issues

Chemical Composition of Marijuana

Marijuana and Its Byproducts Defined
Biological Effects of Marijuana Consumption

States Pending Legalizing Medical Marijuana

                             I. States with Pending Legislation to Legalize Medical Marijuana

1. Alabama Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 386 (1.5 MB) “This bill would authorize the medical use of marijuana only for certain qualifying patients who have been diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating condition.” Allows for the creation of registered compassion centers. Introduced by Rep. Patricia Todd (D) and referred to the House Committee on Health (Mar. 31, 2011)

2. Connecticut Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 5139 (180 KB) “An act authorizing the medical use of marijuana” as directed by a physician. Introduced by House Republican Caucus Leader Penny Bacchiochi and referred to Joint Committee on Judiciary (Jan. 10, 2011)
House Bill:
HB 5900 (185 KB) Allows “state residents with certain debilitating medical conditions to possess and use marijuana for medical purposes in accordance with a physician’s prescription, and licenses [the creation of] alternative treatment centers where patients can obtain prescribed marijuana.” Introduced by Rep. Marie Lopez Kirkley-Bey (D) and referred to Joint Committee on Judiciary (Jan. 24, 2011)
House Bill:
HB 6566 (185 KB) “A qualifying patient shall not be subject to arrest or prosecution… for the compassionate use of marijuana if: (1) The qualifying patient has been diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition; (2)The qualifying patient’s physician has issued a written
certification…” Introduced by the Judiciary Committee and referred to the Joint Committee on Judiciary on Mar. 9, 2011. Public hearing held (Mar. 14, 2011)
Senate Bill:
SB 329 (180 KB) Bill would “permit the palliative use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating medical conditions.” Introduced by Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney (D) and referred to Joint Committee on Judiciary (Jan. 20, 2011)
Senate Bill:
SB 345 (180 KB) Bill would “allow the prescriptive use of marijuana for the relief of pain and suffering related to serious medical conditions.” Introduced by Sen. Gary D. LeBeau (D) and referred to Joint Committee on Judiciary (Jan. 20, 2011)
Governor’s Bill:
SB 1015 (250 KB) “A qualifying patient shall not be subject to arrest or prosecution… for the palliative use of marijuana if: (1) The qualifying patient has been diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition; (2) The qualifying patient’s physician has issued a written certification…; (3) The combined amount of marijuana possessed by the qualifying patient and the primary caregiver for palliative use does not exceed four marijuana plants, each having a maximum height of four feet, and one ounce of usable marijuana…” Drafted by the office of Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, introduced by Sen. Donald Williams (D), Sen. Martin Looney (D), Rep. Christopher Donovan (D), and Rep. Brendan Sharkey (D), and referred to the Joint Committee on Judiciary on Feb. 17, 2011; Public hearing held on Mar. 14, 2011; Referred to Office of Legislative Research and Office of Fiscal Analysis on Apr. 14, 2011; Referred by Senate to Committee on Public Health and received a favorable report (May 4, 2011)

3. Idaho Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 19 (100 KB) “The purpose of [the Idaho Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act] is to protect from arrest, prosecution, property forfeiture, and criminal and other penalties, those patients who use marijuana to alleviate suffering from debilitating medical conditions, as well as their physicians, primary caregivers and those who are authorized to produce marijuana for medical purposes.” lntroduced by Rep. Tom Trail (R) on Jan. 19, 2011; Sent to Health and Welfare committee on Jan. 20, 2011; Informational hearing held (Mar. 30, 2011)

4. Illinois Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 0030 (100 KB) “Creates the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act,” allowing state-registered patients diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition to cultivate medical marijuana or to obtain it from state-regulated dispensaries.”

Amendment 1 repeals the program after three years and prohibits patients from driving for 12 hours after consuming marijuana.

Amendment 2 makes it illegal for dispensaries to make campaign contributions.

Amendment 3 sets a $5,000 non-refundable application fee and $20,000 certificate fee for dispensaries.

Amendment 4 “Excludes from the definition of ‘qualifying patient’ active public safety personnel.”
Pre-filed with clerk by Deputy Majority Leader Lou Lang (D) on Dec. 28, 2010; First reading in the House and referral to Rules Committee on Jan. 12, 2011; Added chief co-sponsor Rep. Angelo Saviano (R) on Jan. 20, 2011; Added chief co-sponsor Rep. Ann Williams (D) on Jan. 21, 2011; Assigned to Human Services Committee on Feb. 8, 2011; House Committee Amendment No.1 filed, referred to Rules Committee, referred to Human Services Committee on Mar. 8, 2011; Adopted by voice vote in Human Services (6-5) and placed on calendar for 2nd reading on Mar. 9, 2011; Amendment 2 filed Apr. 12, 2011; Amendment 3 filed Apr. 22, 2011; Amendment 4 filed May 3, 2011; Third reading held May 4, 2011; Added chief co-sponsors Rep. Kenneth Dunkin (D) and Rep. Sara Feigenholtz (D) on May 5, 2011; Consideration postponed and final action deadline extended to May 20, 2011 (May 5, 2011)

6. Massachusetts Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 625 (100 KB) “The Massachusetts Medical Marijuana Act. It is the purpose of this act to protect patients with debilitating medical conditions, as well as their practitioners and designated caregivers, from arrest and prosecution, criminal and other penalties, and property forfeiture if such patients engage in the medical use of marijuana.” Introduced by Rep. Frank I. Smizik (D) on Jan. 14, 2011; Referred to Joint Committee on Public Health and hearing scheduled for June 28, 2011 (Jan. 24, 2011)
Senate Bill:
SB 1161 (275 KB) “‘The Massachusetts Medical Marijuana Act.’ It is the purpose of this act to protect patients with debilitating medical conditions, as well as their practitioners and designated caregivers, from arrest and prosecution, criminal and other penalties, and property forfeiture if such patients engage in the medical use of marijuana.” Introduced by Sen. Stanley Rosenberg (D) on Jan. 20, 2011; Referred to the Joint Committee on Public Health (Jan. 24, 2011)

7. New Hampshire Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 442 (115 KB) “The purpose of this act is to protect patients with debilitating medical conditions, as well as their physicians and designated caregivers, from arrest and prosecution, criminal and other penalties, and property forfeiture if such patients engage in the medical use of marijuana.” lntroduced by Rep. Evalyn Merrick (D) and referred to the Health, Human Services, and Elderly Affairs Committee on Jan. 6, 2011; Hearing held and bill received a vote of “ought to pass” (14-3) from the committee on Mar. 1, 2011; Passed by House with a vote of 221-96 (Mar. 16, 2011)

Introduced to the Senate Health and Human Services Committee on Mar. 23, 2011; Hearing held with majority report “ought to pass amended” on Apr. 14, 2011; “Laid on table” to delay vote, and would require a 2/3 vote to be brought back for consideration (May 11, 2011)

8. New York Summary History (last action date)
Senate Bill:
S2774 (150 KB) “Legalizes the possession, manufacture, use, delivery, transfer, transport or administration of marihuana by a certified patient or designated caregiver for a certified medical use;… directs the department of health to monitor such use and promulgate rules and regulations for registry identification cards.” Sets possession limit of 2.5 ounces. Introduced by Senate Health Committee Chair Tom Duane (D) and referred to Health Committee (Feb. 1, 2011)

9. North Carolina Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 577 (200 KB) “A qualified patient shall not be subject to arrest, prosecution, or penalty in any manner… for the possession or purchase of cannabis for medical use by the qualified patient if the quantity of usable cannabis possessed or purchased does not exceed an adequate supply…” Prohibits a school, employer, or landlord for penalizing qualified patients for “the presence of cannabis metabolites in the individual’s bodily fluids.” Establishes a registry identification card program and a medical cannabis supply system Introduced by Rep. Kelly Alexander (D), Rep. Patsy Keever (D), and Rep. Pricey Harrison (D) on Mar. 21, 2011; Passed 1st reading in the House and referred to the Committee on Rules, Calendar, and Operations of the House (Apr. 4, 2011)

10. Ohio Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 214 (250 KB) “There is a presumption that a registered qualifying patient or visiting qualifying patient is engaged in the medical use of cannabis if the patient is in possession of a valid registry identification card or valid visiting qualifying patient identification card.” Introduced by Rep. Kenny Yuko (D) and Rep. Robert Hagan (D) and assigned to the Health & Aging committee (Apr. 26, 2011)

11. Pennsylvania Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
SB 1003 (75 KB) The Governor Raymond Shafer Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act provides “for the medical use of marijuana; and repealing provisions of law that prohibit and penalize marijuana use.” Introduced by Sen. Daylin Leach (D) and referred to the Public Health and Welfare committee (Apr. 25, 2011)

II. States with Pending Legislation Favorable to Medical Marijuana But Not Legalizing Its Use

1. Florida Summary History (last action date)
House Joint Resolution:
HJR 1407 (100 KB) A joint resolution that would put a medical marijuana state constitutional amendment on the ballot in 2012. Filed by Rep. Jeff Clemens (D) and first reading held Mar. 8, 2011; Referred to Criminal Justice Subcommittee, Health & Human Services Committee, Judiciary Committee and Criminal Justice Subcommittee (Mar. 14, 2011)
2. Texas Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 1491 (50 KB) Provides an affirmative defense for people being prosecuted for possession of marijuana, if they have a recommendation from a physician to use it “for the amelioration of the symptoms or effects of a bona fide medical condition.” Introduced by Rep. Elliott Naishtat (D) on Feb. 17, 2011; Read and referred to Public Health Committee (Mar. 2, 2011)

III. Passed 2011 Legislation Regarding Medical Marijuana

1. Delaware Summary History
Senate Bill:
SB 17 (100 KB)

[Read more about Delaware on our 16 Medical Marijuana States and DC page.]
“The purpose of this act is to protect patients with debilitating medical conditions, as well as their physicians and providers, from arrest and prosecution, criminal and other penalties, and property forfeiture if such patients engage in the medical use of marijuana.”

Allows people 18 and older with certain debilitating conditions to possess up to six ounces of marijuana with a doctor’s written recommendation.

Amendments prohibit smoking in privately owned vehicles and require marijuana to be dispensed in sealed, tamperproof containers.
lntroduced by Senate Majority Whip Margaret Rose Henry (D) and assigned to Health & Social Services Committee on Jan. 25, 2011; hearing held and reported out of Committee on Mar. 23, 2011; Passed by Senate with a vote of 18-3 (Mar. 31, 2011)

Introduced and Assigned to Health & Human Development Committee in the House on Apr. 5, 2011; Amendments added and bill passed by House with a vote of 27-14 (May 5, 2011)

Returned to the Senate for a vote on the House amendments and passed the Senate with a vote of 17-4 (May 11, 2011)

The bill was signed into law by Governor Jack Markell (D) on May 13, 2011 and will become effective July 1, 2011.
2. Maryland Summary History
Senate Bill:
SB 308 (500 KB)

[This legislation does not legalize medical marijuana in Maryland although it is considered favorable to it.]
“Synopsis: Making marijuana a Schedule II controlled dangerous substance; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to issue a specified request for proposals to select authorized growers of marijuana for medical use; providing for specified requirements of authorized growers…” Introduced by Sen. David Brinkley (R) and Sen. Jamie Raskin (D) with 20 co-sponsors; first reading held in Judicial Proceedings Committee on Feb. 2, 2011; Hearing held on Mar. 3, 2011; Favorable with amendments report by Judicial Proceedings Committee on Mar. 21, 2011; Passed by Senate with a vote of 41-6 on Mar. 24, 2011; Senate concurred with House amendments and passed with a vote of 38-6 (Apr. 7, 2011)

First reading in the House Health and Government Operations and Judiciary Committees on Mar. 22, 2011; Hearings held in both committees on Apr. 1, 2011; Passed by House with a vote of 83-50 (Apr. 6, 2011)

Signed into law by Governor Martin O’Malley on May 10, 2011.

IV. Failed 2011 Legislation

1. Iowa Summary History (date failed)
Senate Bill:
SF 266 (100 KB) “An Act relating to the creation of a medical marijuana Act including the creation of nonprofit dispensaries… A qualifying patient who has been issued and possesses a registry identification card shall not be subject to arrest, prosecution, or penalty in any manner.” Introduced and referred to the Human Resources committee on Feb. 21, 2011; Referred to Human Resources Subcommittee under Senators Bolkcom, Hatch, and Seymour on Feb. 22, 2011. Bill failed because it did not advance out of committee by Mar. 18, 2011 deadline, but it will carry over to the 2012 legislative session (Mar. 18, 2011)
2. Kansas Summary History (date failed)
House Bill:
HB 2330 (150 KB) “An Act enacting the cannabis compassion and care act; providing for the legal use of cannabis for certain debilitating medical conditions; providing for the registration and functions of compassion centers; authorizing the issuance of identification cards.” Introduced Feb. 11, 2011; Referred to the Committee on Health and Human Services on Feb. 14, 2011. Bill failed because it did not advance out of committee by Feb. 25, 2011 deadline, but it will carry over to the 2012 legislative session (Feb. 25, 2011)
3. Mississippi Summary History (date failed)
Senate Bill:
SB 2672 (165 KB) “An act to authorize the medical use of marihuana by seriously ill patients under a physician’s supervision… [and] to transfer marihuana from Schedule I to Schedule II under the Controlled Substances Law… The purpose of this act is to ensure that physicians are not penalized for discussing marihuana as a treatment option with their patients, and that seriously ill people who engage in the medical use of marihuana upon their physicians’ advice are not arrested and incarcerated…” lntroduced by Sen. Deborah Dawkins (D) and referred to Drug Policy committee on Jan. 17, 2011; Died in committee (Feb. 1, 2011)
4. Oklahoma Summary History (date failed)
Senate Bill:
SB 573 (20 KB) The Compassionate Use Act of 2011 removes Oklahoma’s criminal penalties for a patient who “possesses or cultivates marijuana for the personal medical purposes of the patient upon the written or oral recommendation or approval of a physician.” Introduced by Sen. Constance Johnson (D); First reading held Feb. 7, 2011; Second Reading and referral to Health and Human Services committee on Feb. 8, 2011. Bill failed because it did not advance out of committee by Mar. 17, 2011 deadline, but it will carry over to the 2012 legislative session (Mar. 17, 2011)
5. West Virginia Summary History (date failed)
House Bill:
HB 3251 (100 KB) “A qualifying patient shall not be subject to arrest, prosecution or penalty in any manner, or denied any right or privilege… for the medical use of marijuana, provided that the patient possesses a registry identification card and no more than six marijuana plants and one ounce of usable marijuana.”

Also allows for affirmative defense, immunity for registered primary caregivers, protection for physicians, and the creation of compassion centers. Introduced by Rep. Mike Manypenny (D) and referred to House Judiciary committee on Feb. 21, 2011. Bill failed because it did not advance out of committee before the legislature adjourned on Mar. 18, 2011, but it will carry over to the 2012 legislative session (Mar. 18, 2011)

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