Category Archives: Marijuana

I have finally caved and began medication for my fibromyalgia..

Space-filling model of the nortriptyline molec...

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I have finally caved and began medication for my fibromyalgia.. nortriptylin 25mg.  Boy.. the first week was tough.

 

8 1/2 years after my diagnosis I am finally getting treated for my Fibromyalgia.  As a sufferer I can tell you how insidious this syndrome can be first hand.

Over the years I’ve become used to the fatigue and all over pains and accepted it as this is now my life. Until I became so overwhelmed at the end of 2011 with anxiaety and depression due to a lot of life changes. I was paralyzed with fear, anxiety attacks and pain. Even all the aches and pains intensified the more stress the more pain.. I was immobilized. I found myself continually crying over a drop of a hat.  Along with that came lower backside pains (which I am very concerned about), pains radiating from my ovary area.  Finally, I couldn’t take it any more, time to make an appointment.  

Is it just me or when we as FMS patients go to the doctor and we tell the doctor we were diagnosed with FMS the mood of the conversation seems to change? Change in the since that The Doctor begins to chalk all complaints and symptoms off to FMS. Well that’s how I felt a week and a half ago when I made my appointment with a new Dr. I had to explain to him that I am very familiar with the symptoms of FMS having lived through all of them from one point to another. And I don’t want his assumptions to stand in the way of catching other issues sooner than later. He was nice enough to hear me out and rebutted with he believes the depression side of this syndrome has taken over in turn heightened all my other symptoms.  That’s when he suggested this new drug adding  it will help with my sleeping, emotional as well as relieving the pain.  He continued by saying he wants to remove all FMS related symptoms so he can then focus on any other issues he discovers when all my tests results come back. OK so that made sense to me, now I had to cover the side affects.      to be continued…

 

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Nortriptyline Side Effects: An Introduction

article found on eMedTV

As with any medicine, there are possible side effects with nortriptyline hydrochloride (Pamelor®). However, not everyone who takes nortriptyline will experience side effects. In fact, most people tolerate the medication well. When people do develop nortriptyline side effects, often they are minor, meaning they need no treatment or are easily treated by you or your healthcare provider.
 
(This article covers many, but not all, of the possible side effects with nortriptyline. Your healthcare provider can discuss a more complete list of nortriptyline side effects with you.)
 

Common Nortriptyline Side Effects

Nortriptyline has been studied thoroughly in clinical trials in which the side effects of a group of people taking the drug are documented and compared to another group not taking the medicine.

As a result, it is possible to see what side effects occur, how often they appear, and how they compare to the group not taking the medicine.

 
In these studies, the common side effects of nortriptylineinclude:
 
Withdrawal side effects have been reported in people who have stopped taking nortriptyline suddenly. These side effects of nortriptyline withdrawal include nausea, headaches, and a general ill feeling (seePamelor Withdrawal).

Side Effects of Nortriptyline – for the Consumer

article found on Drugs.com

Nortriptyline

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects.Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Nortriptyline:

Dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; excitement; headache; impotence; nausea; nightmares; pupil dilation; sensitivity to sunlight; sweating; tiredness; upset stomach; vomiting; weakness; weight loss or gain.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Nortriptyline:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); blurred vision or other vision changes; changes in sex drive; chest pain; confusion; constipation; fainting; fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat; fever; frequent or difficult urination; hallucinations; impulsive behavior or other unusual changes in behavior; jaw, neck, or muscle spasms; mental or mood changes (eg, increased anxiety, mood swings, agitation, irritability, nervousness, restlessness); panic attacks; ringing in the ears; seizures; severe dizziness or drowsiness; sore throat; stomach pain; suicidal thinking or behavior; swelling of the testicles; tremor; trouble sleeping; trouble walking or keeping your balance; twitching of the face or tongue; uncontrolled movements of arms and legs or stiffness; unusual bleeding or bruising; worsening of depression; yellowing of the skin or eyes.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. To report side effects to the

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right agency, please read the Guide to Reporting Problems to FDA.

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Fibromyalgia Guilt..

mommy-guiltguilt_got-guilt-buttonOkay this is going to be short, sweet and to the point.  As someone who suffers from fibromyalgia also suffers from overwhelming guilt. What do I mean by that? I’ll to you, this syndrome is so inconsistent, it’s impossible to make any futuristic plans. I say that now, even though it’s taken me nine years to reconcile myself to the fact I have now become unreliable.  Which is sad in itself.

 

For example on Sunday I could speak with my mother to make plans to see her on Wednesday, come Wednesday morning I can’t move due to lack of energy, body pain, stiffness and swelling.   So now here comes the phone call at the last minute trying to explain why I will be a no-show once again.  Usually family members understand after years of dealing with my inconsistent behaviors. However to explain to your boss, today is not a good day, doesn’t go over well.

 

And let’s not forget the lack of energy equals the lack of household contributions. There are times that my partner has worked 10 hour shifts to come home to a sink of dirty dishes because I can’t muster up the energy to clean. Once again guilt kicks in, I’m just fortunate enough to have someone who understands. However just because they understand does not mean I don’t feel guilty.

So for all you No Shows, there is nothing we can do about that. We have to just be totally honest with those who we deal with on a daily basis whether it’s:  loved ones, employers or the community we can only do what we can do.  So feeling guilty about not being able to participate at will is just something we have to live with. Being guilty only increases the emotionally depressing side of this syndrome.  As a wrap up you can only do what you can do, give the rest to God.  Till next time.

 

 

 

 

Is it Pain? or Do I Need An Attitude Adjustment?

Yes it’s time for one of my personal experience rants…


mis·er·a·ble
ˈmiz(ə)rəb(ə)l/
adjective
  1. (of a person) wretchedly unhappy or uncomfortable.
    “their happiness made Anne feel even more miserable”
     
    2. pitiably small or inadequate.
    “all they pay me is a miserable $10,000 a year”

 

Am I the only one who is known as the cranky one, the angry one, the mean one or the snippy one?  Same thing when I was working.  No one understands that I am never totally pain free.  Every little movement that others take for granted is a chore for me.   With that said I snapped this past week on the family.  Any cleaning or house work I get done is by sheer miracle and struggle so for someone to come behind me after I have mopped with dripping hands (after washing hands in sink) then leave foot prints or spill something without completely cleaning it drive me crazy.  Why?  I’ll tell you why, after I have have mopped I’m down for days following and let’s not talk about the pain during.   Then for someone to come behind me as if it’s no big deal infuriates me. Most people can do something as simple as cleaning but for someone like me it’s painful and takes me down.  Between the fatigue, limbs feeling like weights and pain in all of the usual tender points I feel tutored at times.

Are tender points large areas of pain?

No. The actual size of the point of most tenderness is usually very small, about the size of a penny. These areas are much more sensitive than other nearby areas. In fact, pressure on one of the tender points with a finger will cause pain that makes the person flinch or pull back. Tender points are scattered over the neck, back, chest, elbows, hips, buttocks, and knees…. more

Speaking about tender points my 18 year old son and my 45 year old partner really don’t get how painful their touch can be.   They are both heavy handed and mean no harm but once the pain hits I am demanding that they stop touching me.  Sounds bitchy?  I’m sure, however at that moment I just want the pain to stop.  I am constantly apologizing for sniping at those I love.

                                                          Or Sometimes I’m Just Plain Ole Miserable

My mood is determined by the amount of pain I am experiencing at that moment.  That’s the depressing part, for me I feel as though my body has turned on me and killed the carefree and light side of me.  This time of the year (Fall) is the beginning of like six months of daily misery.  As the weather begins to change into the cold months my body is at it’s worst.  My partner and I are constantly at odds over the window, what she deems comfortable I myself am suffering.  The only other person in my life who can relate to my pain and discomfort is my mother who her self is 89 and suffers from Rheumatoid Arthritis.  Lastly those who love us don’t understand that they add to our despair when they don’t sympathize or at least try to relate to my struggle.

mis·ery

noun \ˈmi-zə-rē, ˈmiz-rē\

plural mis·er·ies

Definition of MISERY

1: a state of suffering and want that is the result of poverty or affliction
2: a circumstance, thing, or place that causes suffering or discomfort
3: a state of great unhappiness and emotional distress

Examples of MISERY

  1. The war brought misery to thousands of refugees.
  2. They were living in overcrowded slums in conditions of great misery.
  3. a source of human misery
  4. the joy and misery of life
  5. The last years of her life were a misery.
  6. Stop being such a misery.
                         So I’m gonna end with “If you were miserable all the time how happy would you be?”

Breast Cancer Awareness Month.. I need to be examined.

Pink-October-Press-Pack-360x230

As you know I am a 45 year woman who constantly writes about my life dealing with Fibromyalgia however I am also a woman who is very top heavy meaning my breast size is 40DD and concerned about breast cancer. I haven’t had a mammogram in over 4 years and as I write this I have decided to setup an appointment at Methodist Hospital in Park Slope Brooklyn.


In the meantime I have been examining myself for the past 4 years. I have included guides to self examinations for those of you who don’t know how. I must say that it can be a little confusing as to what is your natural breast masses vs a lump to be concerned with.

I am an Adoptee which adds another level of concern, I was born in New Jersey and now live in New York and neither state allows an adoptee to have access to their family medical history. I wouldn’t know if Cancer, Heart Disease or anything else runs in my blood line. Another reason for me to stay vigilant.

If I discovered I have breast cancer I think I would be just like Wanda Sykes but without the money. I would hope my insurance would cover the operation, because if diagnosed with cancer in one breast I would want to remove and replace both. But what about those woman who don’t have insurance? Would they have the same opportunity?
I’m going to do some research on that topic and get back to you.

I must say that the breast is a tricky organ if it in deed is considered an organ. My breast has always had something of dried that I can squeeze from my nipple. Back 4 years ago during my mammogram I brought this to the attention of the Doctor and Technician and was told that’s some what normal. But once again you never know.

Here’s a video I found to help with examining yourself correctly, but once again don’t be like me and think this is enough. I’m finding that it’s not that I just don’t have the time or it’s not important to me. I beginning to learn I am afraid of results, so that’s why I am going to practice what I preach and just do it.

fibromyalgia and sex

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I found this article on WebMD.com

I know this sounds a little crazy but I am space relieved to find that I am not the only one who has no sex life. This is another symptom of fibromyalgia intimacy is very hard at a 18-year-old son and a partner of 10 years that I cannot hug because I am sore and tender to the touch. the slightest touch or pressure hurts extremely, no one understands I believe other than someone else with the same affliction. That’s where I got my idea to create a women’s only site Sirens and Sappho that caters to all women regardless of race status or sexuality. In the decline of my sexual drive a turn to the Internet for stimulation to help and found that it only made me feel cheap and dirty. Everything caters to the satisfaction of named in the using of when and which has never been a turn on for me so hopefully there will be more of us out there where we can discuss and grow our own community to help each other because whether we realize it or not as the article shows below a good sex life is very important physically mentally and emotionally and I would say sometimes spiritually.

fibromyalgia and sex

If you have fibromyalgia, you may also be having problems with your sex life or relationships. You could be experiencing loss of libido or having difficulty with sexual performance. It’s also possible your libido is healthy, but the deep muscle pain and stiffness of fibromyalgia may keep you from enjoying sex the way you used to.

It’s not unusual for people with any chronic illness to complain about having problems with their sex life. But a healthy sex life is important for many reasons. Not only does sex strengthen an intimate relationship, but sexual intercourse boosts endorphins. Those are the body’s natural opioids that help decrease pain and increase well-being. Talking openly with your doctor and following a few practical tips can help you resolve problems associated with fibromyalgia, pain, and sex. Then you can begin to enjoy this aspect of your life again.

more from WebMD

What Causes Loss of Libido With Fibromyalgia?

Some of the medications, such as the SSRI antidepressants like Paxil and Zoloft, used in the treatment of fibromyalgia may cause reduced sex drive. If you take an antidepressant and have problems with libido, talk to your doctor. A simple change of medication or a reduction in dose may improve your sex drive and allow you to enjoy your relationships more.

Also, for some patients, having to deal with the uncomfortable symptoms of fibromyalgia, including the ongoing pain, fatigue, anxiety, and stiffness, is difficult enough without thinking of being physically active with sexual activity. Learning to self-manage these symptoms with medications, exercise, and lifestyle habits may help to boost your sex life.

How Can I Have Sex if I Hurt all Over From Fibromyalgia?

Some fibromyalgia patients give up romantic aspirations for fear of further injury and pain. Yet being intimate with your partner is still possible. With fibromyalgia pain and tender points, you need to work with your partner to find the most comfortable position during sexual intercourse. For instance, if you have fibromyalgia with low back pain, you may find that having your partner on top or lying on his or her side is most comfortable for you. Or, if you’re a woman who has fibromyalgia and hip pain, you might use a pillow between your knees to stabilize your body during sexual intercourse.

Just because you’ve “always had sex this way,” does not mean that’s the only way. You need to be patient, take it slowly, and find the best sexual positions that allow you to be intimate without causing further pain. Keep in mind, there is no right or wrong way to be intimate with your partner.

Can Soaking in a Warm Bath Before Sex Help my Fibromyalgia Pain?

Moist heat, including soaking in a warm bath, can help ease fibromyalgia pain and may allow you to enjoy sexual intercourse — or any exercise — without added pain. Heat increases blood flow to the site and decreases stiffness, important because, along with pain, stiffness is a key symptom of fibromyalgia. Regular moist heat applications or warm baths may help temporarily to alleviate muscle pain or tender point pain, reduce muscle spasms, and decrease inflammation.

When using moist heat, make sure it is not too warm or you can burn your skin. You might soak in a warm bath for at least 15 minutes before sexual intercourse or other physical activity to get the full benefit. You may also soak in a warm bath after sexual intercourse or other physical activity. Other popular types of moist heat include a warm shower (sit on a chair, if needed), warm whirlpool or hot tub, heated swimming pool, and a moist heating pad.

States Pending Legalizing Medical Marijuana

I. States with Pending Legislation to Legalize Medical Marijuana

1. Alabama Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 386 (1.5 MB) “This bill would authorize the medical use of marijuana only for certain qualifying patients who have been diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating condition.” Allows for the creation of registered compassion centers. Introduced by Rep. Patricia Todd (D) and referred to the House Committee on Health (Mar. 31, 2011)

2. Connecticut Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 5139 (180 KB) “An act authorizing the medical use of marijuana” as directed by a physician. Introduced by House Republican Caucus Leader Penny Bacchiochi and referred to Joint Committee on Judiciary (Jan. 10, 2011)
House Bill:
HB 5900 (185 KB) Allows “state residents with certain debilitating medical conditions to possess and use marijuana for medical purposes in accordance with a physician’s prescription, and licenses [the creation of] alternative treatment centers where patients can obtain prescribed marijuana.” Introduced by Rep. Marie Lopez Kirkley-Bey (D) and referred to Joint Committee on Judiciary (Jan. 24, 2011)
House Bill:
HB 6566 (185 KB) “A qualifying patient shall not be subject to arrest or prosecution… for the compassionate use of marijuana if: (1) The qualifying patient has been diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition; (2)The qualifying patient’s physician has issued a written
certification…” Introduced by the Judiciary Committee and referred to the Joint Committee on Judiciary on Mar. 9, 2011. Public hearing held (Mar. 14, 2011)
Senate Bill:
SB 329 (180 KB) Bill would “permit the palliative use of marijuana for individuals with debilitating medical conditions.” Introduced by Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney (D) and referred to Joint Committee on Judiciary (Jan. 20, 2011)
Senate Bill:
SB 345 (180 KB) Bill would “allow the prescriptive use of marijuana for the relief of pain and suffering related to serious medical conditions.” Introduced by Sen. Gary D. LeBeau (D) and referred to Joint Committee on Judiciary (Jan. 20, 2011)
Governor’s Bill:
SB 1015 (250 KB) “A qualifying patient shall not be subject to arrest or prosecution… for the palliative use of marijuana if: (1) The qualifying patient has been diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition; (2) The qualifying patient’s physician has issued a written certification…; (3) The combined amount of marijuana possessed by the qualifying patient and the primary caregiver for palliative use does not exceed four marijuana plants, each having a maximum height of four feet, and one ounce of usable marijuana…” Drafted by the office of Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, introduced by Sen. Donald Williams (D), Sen. Martin Looney (D), Rep. Christopher Donovan (D), and Rep. Brendan Sharkey (D), and referred to the Joint Committee on Judiciary on Feb. 17, 2011; Public hearing held on Mar. 14, 2011; Referred to Office of Legislative Research and Office of Fiscal Analysis on Apr. 14, 2011; Referred by Senate to Committee on Public Health and received a favorable report (May 4, 2011)

4. Idaho Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 19 (100 KB) “The purpose of [the Idaho Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act] is to protect from arrest, prosecution, property forfeiture, and criminal and other penalties, those patients who use marijuana to alleviate suffering from debilitating medical conditions, as well as their physicians, primary caregivers and those who are authorized to produce marijuana for medical purposes.” lntroduced by Rep. Tom Trail (R) on Jan. 19, 2011; Sent to Health and Welfare committee on Jan. 20, 2011; Informational hearing held (Mar. 30, 2011)

5. Illinois Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 0030 (100 KB) “Creates the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act,” allowing state-registered patients diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition to cultivate medical marijuana or to obtain it from state-regulated dispensaries.”

Amendment 1 repeals the program after three years and prohibits patients from driving for 12 hours after consuming marijuana.

Amendment 2 makes it illegal for dispensaries to make campaign contributions.

Amendment 3 sets a $5,000 non-refundable application fee and $20,000 certificate fee for dispensaries.

Amendment 4 “Excludes from the definition of ‘qualifying patient’ active public safety personnel.”
Pre-filed with clerk by Deputy Majority Leader Lou Lang (D) on Dec. 28, 2010; First reading in the House and referral to Rules Committee on Jan. 12, 2011; Added chief co-sponsor Rep. Angelo Saviano (R) on Jan. 20, 2011; Added chief co-sponsor Rep. Ann Williams (D) on Jan. 21, 2011; Assigned to Human Services Committee on Feb. 8, 2011; House Committee Amendment No.1 filed, referred to Rules Committee, referred to Human Services Committee on Mar. 8, 2011; Adopted by voice vote in Human Services (6-5) and placed on calendar for 2nd reading on Mar. 9, 2011; Amendment 2 filed Apr. 12, 2011; Amendment 3 filed Apr. 22, 2011; Amendment 4 filed May 3, 2011; Third reading held May 4, 2011; Added chief co-sponsors Rep. Kenneth Dunkin (D) and Rep. Sara Feigenholtz (D) on May 5, 2011; Consideration postponed and final action deadline extended to May 20, 2011 (May 5, 2011)

6. Massachusetts Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 625 (100 KB) “The Massachusetts Medical Marijuana Act. It is the purpose of this act to protect patients with debilitating medical conditions, as well as their practitioners and designated caregivers, from arrest and prosecution, criminal and other penalties, and property forfeiture if such patients engage in the medical use of marijuana.” Introduced by Rep. Frank I. Smizik (D) on Jan. 14, 2011; Referred to Joint Committee on Public Health and hearing scheduled for June 28, 2011 (Jan. 24, 2011)
Senate Bill:
SB 1161 (275 KB) “‘The Massachusetts Medical Marijuana Act.’ It is the purpose of this act to protect patients with debilitating medical conditions, as well as their practitioners and designated caregivers, from arrest and prosecution, criminal and other penalties, and property forfeiture if such patients engage in the medical use of marijuana.” Introduced by Sen. Stanley Rosenberg (D) on Jan. 20, 2011; Referred to the Joint Committee on Public Health (Jan. 24, 2011)

7. New Hampshire Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 442 (115 KB) “The purpose of this act is to protect patients with debilitating medical conditions, as well as their physicians and designated caregivers, from arrest and prosecution, criminal and other penalties, and property forfeiture if such patients engage in the medical use of marijuana.” lntroduced by Rep. Evalyn Merrick (D) and referred to the Health, Human Services, and Elderly Affairs Committee on Jan. 6, 2011; Hearing held and bill received a vote of “ought to pass” (14-3) from the committee on Mar. 1, 2011; Passed by House with a vote of 221-96 (Mar. 16, 2011)

Introduced to the Senate Health and Human Services Committee on Mar. 23, 2011; Hearing held with majority report “ought to pass amended” on Apr. 14, 2011; “Laid on table” to delay vote, and would require a 2/3 vote to be brought back for consideration (May 11, 2011)

8. New York Summary History (last action date)
Senate Bill:
S2774 (150 KB) “Legalizes the possession, manufacture, use, delivery, transfer, transport or administration of marihuana by a certified patient or designated caregiver for a certified medical use;… directs the department of health to monitor such use and promulgate rules and regulations for registry identification cards.” Sets possession limit of 2.5 ounces. Introduced by Senate Health Committee Chair Tom Duane (D) and referred to Health Committee (Feb. 1, 2011)

9. North Carolina Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 577 (200 KB) “A qualified patient shall not be subject to arrest, prosecution, or penalty in any manner… for the possession or purchase of cannabis for medical use by the qualified patient if the quantity of usable cannabis possessed or purchased does not exceed an adequate supply…” Prohibits a school, employer, or landlord for penalizing qualified patients for “the presence of cannabis metabolites in the individual’s bodily fluids.” Establishes a registry identification card program and a medical cannabis supply system Introduced by Rep. Kelly Alexander (D), Rep. Patsy Keever (D), and Rep. Pricey Harrison (D) on Mar. 21, 2011; Passed 1st reading in the House and referred to the Committee on Rules, Calendar, and Operations of the House (Apr. 4, 2011)

10. Ohio Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 214 (250 KB) “There is a presumption that a registered qualifying patient or visiting qualifying patient is engaged in the medical use of cannabis if the patient is in possession of a valid registry identification card or valid visiting qualifying patient identification card.” Introduced by Rep. Kenny Yuko (D) and Rep. Robert Hagan (D) and assigned to the Health & Aging committee (Apr. 26, 2011)

11. Pennsylvania Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
SB 1003 (75 KB) The Governor Raymond Shafer Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act provides “for the medical use of marijuana; and repealing provisions of law that prohibit and penalize marijuana use.” Introduced by Sen. Daylin Leach (D) and referred to the Public Health and Welfare committee (Apr. 25, 2011)

II. States with Pending Legislation Favorable to Medical Marijuana But Not Legalizing Its Use
1. Florida Summary History (last action date)
House Joint Resolution:
HJR 1407 (100 KB) A joint resolution that would put a medical marijuana state constitutional amendment on the ballot in 2012. Filed by Rep. Jeff Clemens (D) and first reading held Mar. 8, 2011; Referred to Criminal Justice Subcommittee, Health & Human Services Committee, Judiciary Committee and Criminal Justice Subcommittee (Mar. 14, 2011)
2. Texas Summary History (last action date)
House Bill:
HB 1491 (50 KB) Provides an affirmative defense for people being prosecuted for possession of marijuana, if they have a recommendation from a physician to use it “for the amelioration of the symptoms or effects of a bona fide medical condition.” Introduced by Rep. Elliott Naishtat (D) on Feb. 17, 2011; Read and referred to Public Health Committee (Mar. 2, 2011)

III. Passed 2011 Legislation Regarding Medical Marijuana
1. Delaware Summary History
Senate Bill:
SB 17 (100 KB)

[Read more about Delaware on our 16 Medical Marijuana States and DC page.]
“The purpose of this act is to protect patients with debilitating medical conditions, as well as their physicians and providers, from arrest and prosecution, criminal and other penalties, and property forfeiture if such patients engage in the medical use of marijuana.”

Allows people 18 and older with certain debilitating conditions to possess up to six ounces of marijuana with a doctor’s written recommendation.

Amendments prohibit smoking in privately owned vehicles and require marijuana to be dispensed in sealed, tamperproof containers.
lntroduced by Senate Majority Whip Margaret Rose Henry (D) and assigned to Health & Social Services Committee on Jan. 25, 2011; hearing held and reported out of Committee on Mar. 23, 2011; Passed by Senate with a vote of 18-3 (Mar. 31, 2011)

Introduced and Assigned to Health & Human Development Committee in the House on Apr. 5, 2011; Amendments added and bill passed by House with a vote of 27-14 (May 5, 2011)

Returned to the Senate for a vote on the House amendments and passed the Senate with a vote of 17-4 (May 11, 2011)

The bill was signed into law by Governor Jack Markell (D) on May 13, 2011 and will become effective July 1, 2011.
2. Maryland Summary History
Senate Bill:
SB 308 (500 KB)

[This legislation does not legalize medical marijuana in Maryland although it is considered favorable to it.]
“Synopsis: Making marijuana a Schedule II controlled dangerous substance; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to issue a specified request for proposals to select authorized growers of marijuana for medical use; providing for specified requirements of authorized growers…” Introduced by Sen. David Brinkley (R) and Sen. Jamie Raskin (D) with 20 co-sponsors; first reading held in Judicial Proceedings Committee on Feb. 2, 2011; Hearing held on Mar. 3, 2011; Favorable with amendments report by Judicial Proceedings Committee on Mar. 21, 2011; Passed by Senate with a vote of 41-6 on Mar. 24, 2011; Senate concurred with House amendments and passed with a vote of 38-6 (Apr. 7, 2011)

First reading in the House Health and Government Operations and Judiciary Committees on Mar. 22, 2011; Hearings held in both committees on Apr. 1, 2011; Passed by House with a vote of 83-50 (Apr. 6, 2011)

Signed into law by Governor Martin O’Malley on May 10, 2011.

IV. Failed 2011 Legislation
1. Iowa Summary History (date failed)
Senate Bill:
SF 266 (100 KB) “An Act relating to the creation of a medical marijuana Act including the creation of nonprofit dispensaries… A qualifying patient who has been issued and possesses a registry identification card shall not be subject to arrest, prosecution, or penalty in any manner.” Introduced and referred to the Human Resources committee on Feb. 21, 2011; Referred to Human Resources Subcommittee under Senators Bolkcom, Hatch, and Seymour on Feb. 22, 2011. Bill failed because it did not advance out of committee by Mar. 18, 2011 deadline, but it will carry over to the 2012 legislative session (Mar. 18, 2011)
2. Kansas Summary History (date failed)
House Bill:
HB 2330 (150 KB) “An Act enacting the cannabis compassion and care act; providing for the legal use of cannabis for certain debilitating medical conditions; providing for the registration and functions of compassion centers; authorizing the issuance of identification cards.” Introduced Feb. 11, 2011; Referred to the Committee on Health and Human Services on Feb. 14, 2011. Bill failed because it did not advance out of committee by Feb. 25, 2011 deadline, but it will carry over to the 2012 legislative session (Feb. 25, 2011)
3. Mississippi Summary History (date failed)
Senate Bill:
SB 2672 (165 KB) “An act to authorize the medical use of marihuana by seriously ill patients under a physician’s supervision… [and] to transfer marihuana from Schedule I to Schedule II under the Controlled Substances Law… The purpose of this act is to ensure that physicians are not penalized for discussing marihuana as a treatment option with their patients, and that seriously ill people who engage in the medical use of marihuana upon their physicians’ advice are not arrested and incarcerated…” lntroduced by Sen. Deborah Dawkins (D) and referred to Drug Policy committee on Jan. 17, 2011; Died in committee (Feb. 1, 2011)
4. Oklahoma Summary History (date failed)
Senate Bill:
SB 573 (20 KB) The Compassionate Use Act of 2011 removes Oklahoma’s criminal penalties for a patient who “possesses or cultivates marijuana for the personal medical purposes of the patient upon the written or oral recommendation or approval of a physician.” Introduced by Sen. Constance Johnson (D); First reading held Feb. 7, 2011; Second Reading and referral to Health and Human Services committee on Feb. 8, 2011. Bill failed because it did not advance out of committee by Mar. 17, 2011 deadline, but it will carry over to the 2012 legislative session (Mar. 17, 2011)
5. West Virginia Summary History (date failed)
House Bill:
HB 3251 (100 KB) “A qualifying patient shall not be subject to arrest, prosecution or penalty in any manner, or denied any right or privilege… for the medical use of marijuana, provided that the patient possesses a registry identification card and no more than six marijuana plants and one ounce of usable marijuana.”

Also allows for affirmative defense, immunity for registered primary caregivers, protection for physicians, and the creation of compassion centers. Introduced by Rep. Mike Manypenny (D) and referred to House Judiciary committee on Feb. 21, 2011. Bill failed because it did not advance out of committee before the legislature adjourned on Mar. 18, 2011, but it will carry over to the 2012 legislative session (Mar. 18, 2011)